GikPal’s “Army Green” 350lb Paracord Bracelet w/ Firestarter and Whistle

 

A while back I got to try out a paracord bracelet from another manufacturer, and while I was mostly happy with it, I thought when a new one came up it would be a chance to see if they’re still as nifty and handy as I remember. The answer is a qualified “yes!”.

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In fact, this one had some features I liked a lot more, and a couple I liked less. To start, it’s significantly smaller around than the last one I tired, which means it’s probably better suited as a keychain for hubby, but still too large for my wrist, and it can’t be adjusted. The magnesium fire stick is completely enclosed in the clasp and is much easier to strike than the last one I tried, and getting a spark took very little effort. The included “scraper” is small, but being completely enclosed in the end of the clasp makes getting a sure grip easy. In a pinch it can also be used to cut small things (like paracord!) but it’s really far to small to be useful for much else. This GikPal paracord bracelet includes an emergency whistle in the clasp that does tend to poke a bit if worn for a while, but is loud and should be able to heard over quite a long distance. This bracelet used 350lb paracord versus the usual 550lb, but unless you find yourself in and extreme survival situation (and I hope you never do!), then you should be find. It still splits apart like the other types of paracord, so it should be just as useful, just keep in mind the differences in weight tolerance.

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Over all, it’s a decent value for $7.99 and I’d recommend it if for nothing else than to throw in the glove box of your car and pray you never, ever actually need it. But if you do, it’s there and could maybe one day save your life. And if not, you have a neat looking bracelet you can wear, with a whistle to annoy your significant other or friends in the car!

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I received the above product(s) free of charge from GikPal. I am not obligated to provide a positive or favorable review, just my honest opinion. My review is based on my experience with the product and/or brand, which may differ from yours.

Vodiy’s Ombir Pro 25-in-1 Compact Survival Multitool

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My Hubby loves him some tools. Little pocket tools, multi tools, power tools, hand tools, he’s got a place in his heart for all of them. But his love is not unconditional. They have to work, work well, every time, no problems. Or they get kicked to the curb with a quickness. Vodiy offered us a chance to take their Ombir Pro Multitool for a test drive, and anyone care to guess what Hubby’s response was? Let’s just say it was in the enthusiastically affirmative.

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Once it arrived, though, all that enthusiasm quickly dampered. See, I’ve bought him a few different multitools over the years. Gerber, Leatherman, and SOG to name a few. He takes his Leatherman everywhere, because damned if that thing isn’t handy to have around. I’ve even used some of his Leatherman tools when the need arose. But the Vodiy Ombir Pro just didn’t pass muster for a number of reasons. First, we thought we got a bad one, because try as he might, Hubby couldn’t get the various tools to rotate out from the handle. This is a guy that drives nails with his thumbs, and they couldn’t get the blades and file and screwdrivers out with those thumbs. When the replacement arrived from Vodiy, it was more of the same. There’s very few things more dangerous than trying to pry a sharp knife out of the handle it’s tucked into, and I’d just a s soon he didn’t try. It also doesn’t lock open when in use, so I would advise people be very careful if they use it for anything. The entire thing is painted with black paint, not a baked on or anodized finish to ensure it stays on and inhibits corrosion. We know this because Vodiy painted the files as well, and the first thing Hubby filed, the paint flaked off. Speaking of corrosion, the tool sports a socket screwdriver with interchangeable tips. And every single tip was rusted. And then fell out of the socket with minimal pressure or use. The Ombir Pro didn’t close properly on either the first or replacement tool. The handles when closed just don’t meet up. And then there’s the little spring beneath the plier head. It’s cute and makes the most adorable little “sproing” sound with each open and close action, and then broke on one and popped off the other. Not so cute. It’s also heavy, very heavy (Almost 50% moreso than the Sidekick), and I imagine would be very cumbersome in one’s back pocket, which is where Hubby carries his Leatherman.

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I may have expected too much from Vodiy’s Ombir Pro, comparing it so closely to Leatherman. But Leatherman is the industry leader in multitools and they make a damn fine product. And if you’re going to play in that arena, you need to be ready to compete with the big boys. And, not to kick a guy when he’s down, the Leatherman is cheaper. Hubby got his Leatherman Sidekick for under $20. It’s thinner, lighter, has better steel, works like a dream and the fit and finish of it is miles ahead of the Vodiy Ombir Pro, and it was also $5 cheaper. Plus the Leatherman 25 year warranty. It’s just lose-lose with Vodiy’s Ombir Pro, and I’m sorry, but I just can’t recommend it. It needs some work to be useful and everything it could (and should) be. Too bad, because I really wanted to have a multitool of my own. Looks like I’ll have to steal Hubby’s Leatherman Juice when he’s not looking.

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I received the above product(s) free of charge from Vodify.  I am not obligated to provide a positive or favorable review, just my honest opinion.  My review is based on my experience with the product and/or brand, which may differ from yours.

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